WILL THE WORLD BE HUNGER FREE BY 2030?

The WFP, based on their progressive resolution papers and shared propositions to meeting these objectives, had an optimistic approach to reaching the Zero Hunger goal.

The WFP, based on their progressive resolution papers and shared propositions to meeting these objectives, had an optimistic approach to reaching the Zero Hunger goal.

Deep-seated into the World Food Programme meeting, two blocs of delegates have been created to discuss the transparency of food distribution to countries in need.

After being questioned on the topic of trust within alliances, they said that countries would report back to each other if distrust were to happen in their agreements.

Apart from encouraging inclusive food distribution and arrival to localized countries, China brought up the statistic that if countries work in accordance with the second sustainable development goal of Zero Hunger in 2030, the goal could be reached. The main targets of the latter goal consists in ensuring access to nutritious and sufficient food to all people, end all forms of malnutrition, and double the agricultural productivity—all by 2030.

The WFP, based on their progressive resolution papers and shared propositions to meeting these objectives, had an optimistic approach to reaching the Zero Hunger goal.

Achieving this program means the international community will need to find enough food over the next 15 years to feed 795 million starving people. Knowing that the global population is expected to climb to 8.5 billion by 2030 and that climate change is foreseen to ravage crops, ending hunger will require difficult decisions.

With all good intentions to end world hunger, the problem seems to grow day by day. Objectively, this issue is only to be ameliorated, not vanquished.

Maria Dumitrescu-Russia Today