PROBLEMS ARE ENVISIONED WITH THE AI BUT RISKS ARE READY TO BE TAKEN

South Korea voiced their opinion: “AI doesn’t have to be a complicated technology, we think that the utilization of different applications accessed by smartphones can ease the implementation of such technology in developing countries.” 

South Korea voiced their opinion: “AI doesn’t have to be a complicated technology, we think that the utilization of different applications accessed by smartphones can ease the implementation of such technology in developing countries.” 

The UN panel reunited to discuss the early stages of implementing artificial intelligence globally. The main ideas were the use of AI-powered health technologies, which would help diagnose diseases more effectively, assist doctors and intervene in surgery. 

Many developing countries revoked giving these medical devices a try, since “the risks are too high” and that these technologies are “fairly inaccessible to the poor market.” 

South Korea voiced their opinion: “AI doesn’t have to be a complicated technology, we think that the utilization of different applications accessed by smartphones can ease the implementation of such technology in developing countries.” 

Since the member states of the WHO strongly envisioned the market growing, they continued expanding on concrete solutions to increase these machineries’ popularity among existing international and national frameworks.

Many countries perceived these “robots” as “a brilliant thing of human creation” and as “an innovative way of protecting public health.” Industrialized countries were in favour of deepening research on these “mechanical doctors” to improve existing algorithms and redesign them to make less errors in their functions. 

The questions remained as to whether developing countries, the most affected by diseases, insalubrity, and medical problems, would sign into these ideas.

Notwithstanding, the future looks bright for these automated machines. They can process a high number of data in less time than a human ever could. This revolutionary plan could not only save lives, but could also tremendously reduce practice errors and insure a healthier life.

-Russia Today, Maria Dumitrescu